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Theology, Politics & Other Musings » Personal

Archive for the ‘Personal’ Category

Race You to the Top!

Monday, January 5th, 2015

I kind of get weak knees just watching this.

I’d love to know how much this guy gets paid.

Medical Alert Systems

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

So I did a lot of research on medical alert systems. You know, the whole “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up”. And so if you fall you push the pendant button (or wrist button if you go that route) and a company comes on the line and asks if you need an ambulance sent.

This link was extremely helpful in giving me ten companies to look at.

I went with Alert1 because they had a voice extender that appears to be what I need. And what I need is this: if my dad pushes his button from his apartment (in the basement), I need to know that he pushed it. With me being on the first or second floor the extender will let me know that my dad pushed his medical alert button. This is extremely helpful for two reasons: 1) our house is big so even if my dad yelled for help I likely wouldn’t hear him 2) he usually pushes the button at night when I’m fast asleep. So when he pushes the button not only will they talk to him through his phone set in the basement, they’ll also come across the “extender” and I will hear them talk as well. This will alert me to the fact my dad pushed the button.

Of course, I’m set-up in their system to be called before they call the ambulance. And so I would receive a phone call from them on my cell phone which would work, too. However, with our current company (ADT–which I don’t recommend at all) there have been two times where I wasn’t near my cell phone and he pushed his button. So 911 was called and I wasn’t even aware of it (and in both cases he had accidentally hit the button and didn’t realize it). And, no, ADT didn’t come online and talk to him. They just sent the ambulance. One reason I got rid of them.)

Need help approaching the subject with an elderly parent? The video below from Consumer Affairs is very helpful.

I hope this helps. A medical alert device is good for peace of mind–both for me and my dad.

Delete a File on a Apple Mac Computer

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

I found a shortcut to delete a file on a Mac.  I thought I would pass it along as it has taken me awhile to find a solution to Mac’s normal ways to delete a file.

Deleting a file in a Mac is usually done by dragging the file into the Trash.  Pretty easy.  Except that when you use a laptop, it requires you to (usually) use two fingers to operate the mouse so that you can both click and then drag the file.

The other option that most people know about is right-clicking on a file.  Of course, if you don’t have an external mouse, again it can take more than a quick push of a button to delete a file.

So I have been looking for a quick, easy, painless solution.  The first solution is quicker than the above two, but still requires two hands (or one extremely large hand).  When you select a file and want to delete it, simply press Command+Delete.  Presto!  The file will be moved to the Trash.

But how about an even quicker solution?  It is rather simple.  Go to System Preferences and make sure the “Keyboard Shortcuts” tab at the top is selected.  Then selection “Application Shortcuts”.  Click the “+” button to add a new shortcut.  Choose which application you want this to be used in by selecting it from the drop down menu.  In this case, choose “Finder”.  Then in the Menu Title type: Move to Trash.  Finally, in the Keyboard Shortcut, choose the shortcut you want to use to delete a file.  I chose Command+E.  (To do this, I simply pressed Command+E and the shortcut was set.)

I tested this out several times and it works great.  With one quick move of the hand I can easily delete a file.  And since it’s a combination of two keys, I’m less likely to accidentally hit a key (like the “delete” key on a PC) and delete a file.

Hope this helps someone!

Our Treatment of Jesus

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

Luke 3:16 “John answered them all, saying, “I baptize you with water, but he who is mighteir than I is coming, the strap of whose sandals I am not worthy to untie…”

If John saw that his relationship with Jesus was one of unworthiness and humility, this should affect how we view our own personal relationship with Jesus.

Do we put Jesus on our level and treat him like a peer? True, he is our friend. But he is much more than that. And to simply treat him as a guy we pal around with is a great insult to him.

God Remembers

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Genesis 19:29 “So it was that, when God destroyed the cities of the valley, God remembered Abraham and sent Lot out of the midst of the overthrow when he overthrew the cities in which Lot had lived.”

God spared Lot’s life because of God’s covenant with Abraham. God “remembered” Abraham; that is, he knew he had covenanted with Abraham. That covenant was intact and had bearing for Abraham’s relationships. God did not spare Lot because of his righteousness but because of Abraham.

One commentary said this:
The verse includes an explanation for Lot’s deliverance, attributing his salvation to God’s covenant relationship with Abraham. “Remembered” (zākar), another allusion to the flood (8:1), is typical covenant terminology, indicating loyalty (e.g., Exod 2:24; 6:5; 32:13; Pss 105:42; 106:45)…“God remembered” identifies the prior covenant obligation (12:3) as the basis for the divine intervention, not the righteousness of Lot. Although the mention of Abraham brings to mind the appeal of the patriarch (18:16–33), “God remembered” directly refers to the privileged position of Abraham. The divine motivation for the initial disclosure to Abraham is his election (“For I have chosen him,” 18:19), which then prompted his intercession for the cities. That God’s benevolence toward Lot arose from his commitment to Abraham thus begins and ends the Sodom segment (18:17–19; 19:29). – New American Commentary, Genesis by K.A. Mathews